Blog articles tagged 'f#', 'project euler'

0
comment
on 2/1/2016 12:00 AM
Tweet The problem description is here, and click here to see all my other Euler solutions in F#.   This is a more difficult version of problem 82, and now you can move in all four directions! As before, we start by loading the input data into a 2D array: [...]
.
0
comment
on 1/28/2016 12:00 AM
Tweet The problem description is here, and click here to see all my other Euler solutions in F#.   This is a more difficult version of problem 81, but still, as you can’t move left so we can still optimize one column at a time. First, let’s read the input[...]
.
0
comment
on 1/14/2016 12:00 AM
Tweet The problem description is here, and click here to see all my other Euler solutions in F#.   I based my solution on Euclid’s formula for generating Pythagorean triples. And given that max L is 1,500,000, the maximum value for m we need to consider i[...]
.
0
comment
on 10/18/2014 1:27 PM
Problem Consider the following “magic” 3-gon ring, filled with the numbers 1 to 6, and each line adding to nine. Working clockwise, and starting from the group of three with the numerically lowest external node (4,3,2 in this example), each solution can b[...]
.
0
comment
on 10/18/2014 7:56 AM
Problem All square roots are periodic when written as continued fractions and can be written in the form: For example, let us consider ?23: If we continue we would get the following expansion: The process can be summarised as follows: It can be seen that [...]
.
0
comment
on 10/18/2014 6:04 AM
Problem It is well known that if the square root of a natural number is not an integer, then it is irrational. The decimal expansion of such square roots is infinite without any repeating pattern at all. The square root of two is 1.41421356237309504880…, [...]
.
0
comment
on 10/18/2014 4:50 AM
Problem Triangle, square, pentagonal, hexagonal, heptagonal, and octagonal numbers are all figurate (polygonal) numbers and are generated by the following formulae: The ordered set of three 4-digit numbers: 8128, 2882, 8281, has three interesting properti[...]
.
0
comment
on 7/6/2013 5:59 AM
Problem The primes 3, 7, 109, and 673, are quite remarkable. By taking any two primes and concatenating them in any order the result will always be prime. For example, taking 7 and 109, both 7109 and 1097 are prime. The sum of these four primes, 792, repr[...]
.
0
comment
on 9/11/2011 9:10 AM
Problem Each character on a computer is assigned a unique code and the preferred standard is ASCII (American Standard Code for Information Interchange). For example, uppercase A = 65, asterisk (*) = 42, and lowercase k = 107. A modern encryption method is[...]
.
0
comment
on 9/11/2011 6:07 AM
Problem A common security method used for online banking is to ask the user for three random characters from a passcode. For example, if the passcode was 531278, they may ask for the 2nd, 3rd, and 5th characters; the expected reply would be: 317. The text[...]
.
IntelliFactory Offices Copyright (c) 2011-2012 IntelliFactory. All rights reserved.
Home | Products | Consulting | Trainings | Blogs | Jobs | Contact Us
Built with WebSharper