Blog articles tagged 'f#', 'performance'

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on 2/8/2016 11:14 AM
It's pretty straightforward to do basic benchmarking of a single, self-contained piece of code in .NET. You just make a Stopwatch sandwich (let sw = Stopwatch.StartNew(); <code goes here>; sw.Stop()), then read off the elapsed time from the Stopwatch. Wha[...]
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on 12/27/2015 8:27 PM
This holiday season my brief indulgence was solving the Advent of Code puzzles. One was about the look-and-say sequence. It starts with “1” and grows as follows: 1 is read off as “one 1” or 11. 11 is read off as “two 1s” or 21. 21 is read off as “one 2, t[...]
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on 5/18/2015 10:34 AM
The near-complete obviation of nulls is perhaps the most frequently- (and hilariously-) cited benefit of working in F#, as compared to C#. Nulls certainly still exist in F#, but as a practical matter it really is quite rare that they need to be considered[...]
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on 9/21/2014 11:07 AM
I recently saw a tweet from Ryan Riley linking to an article exploring F# performance and floating point processing: This blog post highlighted some perf issues (minor) in #fsharp that surprised me. http://t.co/D2Q6ZtorhW Anyone able to explain? — Ryan Ri[...]
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on 9/13/2014 4:36 PM
On application monitoring In the Gamesys social team, our view on application monitoring is such that anything that runs in production needs to be monitored extensively all the time – every service entry point, IO operations or CPU intensive tasks. Sure, [...]
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on 11/1/2013 3:00 PM
I recently bought an iPhone 5S (this is partly why I’ve taken a short detour from the platform game – this will resume in my next post!). Once again Apple have managed to create hype around a new CPU which … Continue reading →
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on 6/3/2012 5:38 PM
I have heard a few people argue that when it comes to performance critical code you should prefer arrays over other collections (such as F#’s lists) as it benefits from sequential reads (which is faster than seeks) and offers better memory locality. To te[...]
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on 3/11/2012 4:58 PM
In this edition we are going to be doing a taste test, C# vs F#. Oh yeah, if you quickly glanced at the title you may have thought this
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on 12/15/2011 2:43 PM
In this article I discuss why F# Async is a good thing for writing concurrent software on .NET and show how to implement your own Async specialized for low-concurrency use. As a sample application, I look at a simple CML-style blocking channel.[...]
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on 12/11/2011 3:30 PM
Due to popular demand… well, I had a couple of requests anyway :-) So heres my post inspired by my recent encounters profiling some of the code in Fracture-IO.  I have recently been profiling the code in fracture to remove any so called low hanging fruits[...]
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