Blog articles tagged 'programming'

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on 11/30/2011 5:10 PM
I stumbled upon this interesting question on StackOverflow today, Jon Harrop’s answer mentions a significant overhead in adding and iterating over a SortedDictionary and Map compared to using simple arrays. Thinking about it, this makes sense, the SortedD[...]
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on 11/18/2011 12:30 AM
Following my back-to-back talks with the UK Developers Group and NxtGenUG Southampton, I just like to say thanks those guys for having me, it’s been a great pleasure For anyone interested, here are the links to the slides and the source code I used for th[...]
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on 9/11/2011 9:10 AM
Problem Each character on a computer is assigned a unique code and the preferred standard is ASCII (American Standard Code for Information Interchange). For example, uppercase A = 65, asterisk (*) = 42, and lowercase k = 107. A modern encryption method is[...]
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on 9/11/2011 6:07 AM
Problem A common security method used for online banking is to ask the user for three random characters from a passcode. For example, if the passcode was 531278, they may ask for the 2nd, 3rd, and 5th characters; the expected reply would be: 317. The text[...]
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on 9/9/2011 4:34 PM
Problem Some positive integers n have the property that the sum [ n + reverse(n) ] consists entirely of odd (decimal) digits. For instance, 36 + 63 = 99 and 409 + 904 = 1313. We will call such numbersreversible; so 36, 63, 409, and 904 are reversible. Lea[...]
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on 9/8/2011 11:11 AM
Problem The number 145 is well known for the property that the sum of the factorial of its digits is equal to 145: 1! + 4! + 5! = 1 + 24 + 120 = 145 Perhaps less well known is 169, in that it produces the longest chain of numbers that link back to [...]
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on 9/7/2011 10:09 AM
Problem Peter has nine four-sided (pyramidal) dice, each with faces numbered 1, 2, 3, 4. Colin has six six-sided (cubic) dice, each with faces numbered 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. Peter and Colin roll their dice and compare totals: the highest total wins. The resul[...]
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on 9/7/2011 7:35 AM
Problem By counting carefully it can be seen that a rectangular grid measuring 3 by 2 contains eighteen rectangles: Although there exists no rectangular grid that contains exactly two million rectangles, find the area of the grid with the nearest solution[...]
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on 9/7/2011 4:09 AM
Problem In the 5 by 5 matrix below, the minimal path sum from the top left to the bottom right, by only moving to the right and down, is indicated in bold red and is equal to 2427. Find the minimal path sum, in matrix.txt (right click and ‘Save Link/Targe[...]
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on 9/6/2011 5:33 PM
Problem Comparing two numbers written in index form like 211 and 37 is not difficult, as any calculator would confirm that 211 = 2048 < 37 = 2187. However, confirming that 632382518061 > 519432525806 would be much more difficult, as both numbers contain o[...]
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